Notre Dame Stories brings you perspective on the world’s top news stories and tells the stories of Notre Dame’s work to be a force for good in the world. Produced by the Office of Public Affairs and Communications, episodes range from interviews with experts to storytelling from the places where research is taking place. In addition, Notre Dame Stories releases special series about once a year focusing on a particular subject area such as a part of the world where Notre Dame has one of its Global Gateways or a topical area in which our students are engaged to help unify, heal, and enlighten a world deeply in need. Subscribe to Notre Dame Stories where you get your podcasts.

  1. Header Current Factory 800

    Helping the Last of the Instrument Makers

    ConnSelmer is the last major manufacturer of band instruments in the United States. They were looking for ways to innovate to keep their operations in-country. That's when they received a boost from iNDustry Labs, Notre Dame's platform for collaboration between the University and local manufacturers.…

  2. Diggs 600

    The 2022 Valedictorian: Devin Diggs

    The Class of 2022 valedictorian Devin Diggs joins us to talk about his Notre Dame story, and what's in store after commencement. Among other activities, Diggs worked in Dr. Jessica Payne's Sleep, Stress and Memory Lab. Find out more about the lab at samlab.nd.edu. Learn more about the SAM Lab…

  3. Borys 600

    A Conversation with Commencement Speaker Archbishop Borys Gudziak

    On March 23rd, Ukrainian Metropolitan-Archbishop Borys Gudziak was announced as the keynote speaker at Notre Dame’s 177th commencement ceremony. Ten days earlier, Archbishop Gudziak sat down for an interview for the Henri Nouwen Now and Then podcast, produced by the Henri Nouwen Society. Henri Nouwen was a Dutch-born Catholic priest who taught psychology at Notre Dame for a time. The society that bears his name is dedicated to advancing Nouwen’s spiritual vision.…

  4. Ukraine Podcast 2022

    Ukraine: Sanctions, War Crimes, and International Law

    After 3 weeks, the war in Ukraine is only becoming costlier, and deadlier for both the militaries fighting, and the civilians caught in the middle. We spoke with Mary Ellen O’Connell, the Robert and Marion Short Professor of Law, about the international legal framework that could help bring the war to a close, and deal with its aftermath.…

  5. Wireless 2022

    Understanding the 5G rollout

    The rollout of 5G seemed to be going along smoothly until it wasn’t. So why did the airline industry ask for a pause in some areas? And, should we expect other disruptions in the future? For answers, we turned to Nick Laneman, co-director of the Notre Dame Wireless Institute. Learn more about the Institute's work…

  6. Beijing 2022 600

    The Winter Olympics, Equality in Sports, and Exercising in the Cold

    The Winter Olympics are here, and while they provide hours of incredible viewing for sports fans, they also offer insights into life and society. To explore the Olympics in this light, we turn to Cara Ocobock, assistant professor of anthropology. In a wide-ranging discussion, Prof. Ocobock explains what makes the Olympics so appealing, but also what needs to happen to achieve greater equality for male and female athletes. Finally, Ocobock talks about what happens to the body in extreme temperatures, citing insights from her research working with reindeer herders in northern Finland.…

  7. Ups Delivery 800

    What's going on with the supply chain?

    One of the biggest stories in the last half of 2021 was the supply chain. It seems everyone was impacted by shortages or delays in getting a product from a manufacturer to a consumer. Well now that we’ve turned the page into 2022, where do we stand? To find out, we spoke with Kaitlin Wowak, associate professor of IT, analytics, and operations in the Mendoza College of Business.…

  8. Christmas Star

    What was the Christmas Star?

    The Gospel account of St. Matthew includes a peculiar episode: Magi or wise men who followed a star to the place of Jesus’ birth. Grant Mathews, a Notre Dame astrophysicist, details the astronomical phenomenon he believes led them to Bethlehem. Re-edited version of the episode that aired Nov. 30, 2018.…

  9. Wilson

    Tortured by the Police

    What do you do when the officers that are supposed to protect and serve the public are the ones torturing their suspects? Not in a third-world country, but in the city of Chicago. If you're a civil rights attorney, you stand up and defend the rights of those being abused -- regardless of whether the fight takes three decades, the tortured have been jailed as long as you've been alive, or you're a recent Notre Dame Law School graduate drawn to the effort.…

  10. Crown 600

    The Great Crown Caper

    Tour guides have been answering questions about it for years. There's a large gold crown in a case, situated by the elevators in Notre Dame's Main Building (aka, the "Golden Dome"). A plaque inside the case offers some explanation, but there's much more to know. Turns out, this crown may not be the most famous piece of royal headwear the University has received. Our story is about two crowns, one crime, and one unsolved mystery.…

  11. Social Media 600

    Social Media, Misinformation, and You

    It's one of the biggest news stories of the month: social media and the spread of misinformation. While Facebook garnered much attention over the past several weeks, the problem of misinformation goes back far longer and is far broader than many people realize. In this episode, we chat with Tim Weninger, Frank M. Friemann Associate Prof. of Engineering. His work in this area goes back to the dawn of ISIS in the Middle East and continues today through the development of a suite of forensics tools to help fight coordinated misinformation campaigns.…

  12. Music Notes 600

    Making a Musical

    Ronnie and Alex Mansour chose Notre Dame over a traditional music conservatory because the University’s music program allowed them the flexibility to do it, as Sinatra would say, their way. In this episode, Brendan O'Shaughnessy tells the story of the siblings who charted their own creative path at the University.…

  13. Remembering911

    Remembering 9/11

    Fr. Malloy offers his reflection on the events of 9/11 and what followed for the campus community and himself.…

  14. Proving Innocence Ep5

    No Evidence, No Hope

    Iris Seabolt was convicted of felony murder in 2004 and sentenced to 45 years in prison. Prosecutors did not accuse her of killing restaurant owner A.J. Williams, but claim she was the female lure in an intended robbery that ended in murder. The police presented no physical evidence at all in her trial. Instead, a series of witnesses claimed they heard Seabolt admit her guilt. Seabolt lost hope, so she took a plea deal. All those witnesses have since recanted, saying they were coerced into lying by a corrupt and disgraced police officer.…

  15. Proving Innocence

    One Call Can Change Everything

    In the fourth installment of the Proving Innocence series, the Notre Dame law students take on the case of Leon Tyson. He was convicted of a 2015 murder in Elkhart, but the Notre Dame Exoneration Justice Clinic believes he is innocent. He was sentenced to 63 years in prison. The case took a turn when the students and professor placed a call to the mother of a man who was also there during the crime. Her revelations intrigued the students, but the case may turn on the question of hair -- witnesses said the shooter had dreadlocks, but Tyson has long had alopecia, a condition that makes him bald.…

  16. Owen 600

    The journey: The 2021 valedictorian

    In the final episode of the season, we sit down with Madeline Owen, the valedictorian of the class of 2021. Madeline discusses her Notre Dame journey, and what it meant to finish that journey here, on campus. Read more about Madeline…

  17. Solar 600

    Before the Sunrise: St. Joseph’s Farm

    In this episode, we look at the history of St. Joseph’s Farm, a place where religious brothers cultivated land to provide fuel for the University. Today, the farm is being used to produce another kind of fuel: solar power.…

  18. Relief 600

    Will the stimulus slash poverty?

    The American Rescue Plan—the latest pandemic stimulus—was signed into law earlier this month and it was billed as a means to slash poverty. We discuss that proposition with Jim Sullivan, economist and co-founder of the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities…

  19. Usps 600

    What’s going on with the mail?

    For the better part of a year, the mail has been increasingly slow…and COVID is only partly to blame. To find out what’s behind this we spoke with James O’Rourke, professor of management in the Mendoza College of Business…

  20. Vaccine 600

    Developing a COVID-19 Vaccine

    As most of the country awaits their turn in line to receive a coronavirus vaccine, some have questions about its safety, how it was developed, and what it means for life…after the vaccination. Today we talk with Dr. Mark Mulligan '80, an infectious disease expert and head of NYU’s Langone Vaccine Center. Dr. Mulligan has worked on vaccine trials for decades, including most recently, the vaccine for COVID-19.…

View Archive